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2020 Projects

Changing Minds About Negotiation and Gender

Kassidy Chan ’22; Boyang Xu ’21; Anudari Sharavdorj ’22
Majors: Computer Science; Economics & Business; Economics

Kassidy Chan ’22; Boyang Xu ’21; Anudari Sharavdorj ’22

Majors: Computer Science; Economics & Business; Economics

Research Collaborators: Deirdre Snyder; Diana Arechaederra; Eden Alemayehu

Faculty Collaborator: Christina Radar, Economics & Business

Although a large body of research demonstrates gender inequity in negotiation, it is still not a widely recognized issue. To combat this issue, people must be informed. However, one must consider who should and can advocate for change and whether gender matters when conveying or receiving these messages. This study investigated if the gender of message sources and targets affects the persuasiveness of the message. We hypothesized that a female source may result in less persuasion, there may be more resistance from male targets to female sources and the level of threat in the messages could affect message persuasiveness. From our study of over 1,700 participants, preliminary results suggest a main effect of target gender in the two article conditions that were deemed most threatening to males. Male participants rated the threatening articles lower than their female counterparts but had similar ratings when presented with a non-gender specific article or less threatening article condition. However, preliminary results did not find a main effect of source gender or interaction of target and source gender.

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